You are here

A Prescription for Peace

Date: 29 November 2020

The current Covid-19 pandemic has brought much chaos to the world. Many lives have been lost, and many have lost their jobs or businesses. Social and economic activities are tightly regulated now, and even worship services have been affected, with restrictions placed on worshippers and music. Although vaccines are being developed, there are still unknowns associated with them. It is easy to be anxious and troubled because the future just seems so bleak, and there is no end in sight. 

It is at this very juncture of a seemingly bleak future that we can identify with Jesus’ troubled disciples who heard that Jesus would be leaving them. These were men who left their jobs and families to follow Jesus in the hope that He was the promised Messiah, and a few days earlier they were ecstatic when He rode into Jerusalem as the King. However, Jesus was now talking of his imminent execution, which would be instigated by one of His disciples (John 13:18), and even Peter would deny Him three times (John 13:38). It was no wonder that these men were anxious and troubled; their future seemed so bleak now! 

Therefore, it was important for Jesus to comfort their anxious and troubled hearts. Jesus said to them, “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you (John 14:1-2)?” That was Jesus’ prescription for peace; to have faith in who He is, and in what He will do. He was going away to prepare a place for them, and would return to take them to it. Moreover, He had to go away so that the Holy Spirit could be given to them, to help them do the greater works entrusted to them: But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you. Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid (John 14:26-27). 

We may be anxious and troubled because the future seems bleak, but let us remember Jesus’ prescription for peace, knowing that our ultimate destiny is in spending eternity with God. Yes, we may face trials or suffering along the way, but we can be rest assured that God will use them to do the greater works that He has entrusted to us, with the help of the Holy Spirit.
 

Pr Herna Kong